Why Jeremy Corbyn's 2017 general election 'youthquake' was a 'myth'

Why Jeremy Corbyn's 2017 general election 'youthquake' was a 'myth'

Labour's better than expected 2017 general election was not the result of a "youthquake”, new research has shown.

Why Jeremy Corbyn's 2017 general election 'youthquake' was a 'myth'
Why Jeremy Corbyn's 2017 general election 'youthquake' was a 'myth' News Guide
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Labour's better than expected 2017 general election was not the result of a "youthquake”, new research has shown.

An analysis of voter turnout at last year’s poll has revealed that Jeremy Corbyn did not persuade young people who previously failed to vote to back him as was widely believed.

The authors of the British Election Study (BES) research said the "youthquake" was a “myth” and that “there was no surge in youth turnout at the 2017 election”.

The research found that while Labour did increase its vote share among young voters, under 25s were not more likely to turnout in 2017 than in previous years.

Labour's leader - regularly greeted with chants of "Oh Jeremy Corbyn" and often pictured surrounded by young people during the election campaign - was often credited with mobilising previously disengaged voters.

But the study said the claims were "largely based on anecdotes", suggesting Mr...

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